kiefyleafy:

buonfresco:

19th & 20th century tiaras

ahhhhh

posted 10 hours ago on 4/24/2014 + 54430 notes
via ryl-e-coyote - from buonfresco



vivelareine:

When Gilbert Adrian began to design his sumptuous, extravagant gowns for MGM’s Marie Antoinette, the feature was intended to be filmed in color. Adrian spared no expense in choosing the most extravagant of fabrics, colors and designs for his pieces—much to the ire of the MGM heads who balked at the increasingly high production cost for the film. When Sidney Franklin was replaced as director by W.S. Van Dyke, the decision was made to cut the plans for technicolor and film Marie Antoinette in black and white to curb the already bloated budget for the film. The result was that many of Adrian’s gowns, as seen in the film, appear in extremes of black or white—such as a gown worn by Anita Louise as the princesse de Lamballe, which appears entirely black on film but was in fact purple; or the apparently white ballgown worn by Norma Shearer which was actually a brilliant shade of light blue.

posted 19 hours ago on 4/24/2014 + 739 notes
via vivelareine
#holy shITT #norma i cant w/u anymoree #im in love



vivelareine:

—Marie Antoinette (1938)

posted 19 hours ago on 4/24/2014 + 996 notes
via vivelareine



posted 19 hours ago on 4/24/2014 + 404 notes
via tracylord



homohustle:

jotarokujo:

what if the new animal species we discover each year are actually being dropped off by aliens? like they have an over abundance of yeti crabs or something and so they brought some to earth because they knew we’d get a kick out of this

image

This is the cutest conspiracy theory I’ve ever heard

posted 21 hours ago on 4/24/2014 + 33642 notes
via faghornlegwhore - from jotarokujo



Of course they know.

[That Vulture article from April 2013]

posted 21 hours ago on 4/24/2014 + 67460 notes
via jobynaralstons - from iwantcupcakes
#yesss



fuckyeahabandonedplaces:

Pictured here is the remains of one of the most mysterious abandoned locations in Monroe County, Tennessee—the Coker Creek Sanitarium. This enormous ruin sits on top of an isolated mountain some 4 miles above civilization in the small mountain community of Coker Creek.
According to what I’ve recently been told, this location was part of an extremely ambitious project that had been planned out by an eccentric local physician named William A. “Doc” Rogers sometime during the 1940s. Doc was well known for his projects, which often resulted in failure. His TB hospital was no exception. A Coker Creek woman recently messaged me and informed me that her parents actually helped Doc to build his hospital. She recalled as a young child walking through this building and seeing numerous hospital beds, wheelchairs, and other medical supplies. She spoke of seeing wheelchair ramps and even a nurse’s station, which lies in ruins a short distance away from the main hospital. There were even plans of building a major road that would’ve connected Coker Creek and Tellico Plains to the hospital. A helipad was also being built further up the mountain. For whatever reason, Doc suddenly abandoned his project and moved back to Tellico Plains during the 1950s, leaving behind the TB hospital that he had built. It burnt down sometime during the 1980s when an arsonist set fire to it.

fuckyeahabandonedplaces:

Pictured here is the remains of one of the most mysterious abandoned locations in Monroe County, Tennessee—the Coker Creek Sanitarium. This enormous ruin sits on top of an isolated mountain some 4 miles above civilization in the small mountain community of Coker Creek.

According to what I’ve recently been told, this location was part of an extremely ambitious project that had been planned out by an eccentric local physician named William A. “Doc” Rogers sometime during the 1940s. Doc was well known for his projects, which often resulted in failure. His TB hospital was no exception. A Coker Creek woman recently messaged me and informed me that her parents actually helped Doc to build his hospital. She recalled as a young child walking through this building and seeing numerous hospital beds, wheelchairs, and other medical supplies. She spoke of seeing wheelchair ramps and even a nurse’s station, which lies in ruins a short distance away from the main hospital. There were even plans of building a major road that would’ve connected Coker Creek and Tellico Plains to the hospital. A helipad was also being built further up the mountain. For whatever reason, Doc suddenly abandoned his project and moved back to Tellico Plains during the 1950s, leaving behind the TB hospital that he had built. It burnt down sometime during the 1980s when an arsonist set fire to it.

posted 21 hours ago on 4/24/2014 + 488 notes
via fuckyeahabandonedplaces



matineemoustache:

David Niven in A Matter Of Life And Death (1946)

posted 21 hours ago on 4/24/2014 + 39 notes
via stateofgreen - from matineemoustache
#inhuman screeching #loveee



posted 1 day ago on 4/23/2014 + 775 notes
via jicheshire - from meiringens



I made one of those music player things for my blog guys!

posted 1 day ago on 4/23/2014 + 3 notes